Tag Archives: poultry

Mama’s Meat Sauce

Wheat-free * Dairy-free * Gluten-free *  Paleo ~~ 

IMG_8614

So last week I wrote about zucchetti and promised to give you a meat sauce to use with it.  True to my word, here it is…and it’s easy and pretty quick (only cooks for 30 minutes)!  It makes a lot, but the great news is it’s one of those foods that freezes beautifully.  I freeze it in individual portions and then just pull one out of the freezer whenever I want a quick meal.

This is one of those recipes where you can use any ground meat and still end up with a tasty sauce.  You can use beef, buffalo, pork, chicken, turkey, veal, ostrich, or sausage or any other ground meat or combination of meats you can think of.
Enjoy!
Continue reading Mama’s Meat Sauce

Paleo Sukiyaki

Wheat-free * Dairy-free * Gluten-free *  Paleo ~

Paleo Beef Sukiyaki

CIMG2769

Despite the fact that I grew up in a family that loved good food, the number of different cuisines we tried was pretty much limited to Hungarian, Italian, Chinese, French, and Deli.  It wasn’t until after college that I first had Japanese food and then it took me another 30 years before I tried sushi.  In those before-sushi-years my go to dish was always beef sukiyaki.  I loved the flavors as well as the show they put on when they cooked it at your table.

Fast forward many years – I’m a vegetarian and writing my book “1,000 Vegetarian Recipes” and as you can imagine, I’m trying to find diverse recipes for each chapter.  Memories of beef sukiyaki float to my mind and before you know it I developed a great tofu sukiyaki.  I will say that of the 1,000 recipes in that book, the tofu sukiyaki was  probably one of the top ten I made over and over…you can tell by looking at the soy sauce stains on the page. In fact one it was one of the things that I really missed when I became paleo.

Never to be one to pass up a challenge, this week I set my mind to paleo sukiyaki.  I went back to the original beef sukiyaki that started my love for it and then set about converting the sauce to paleo approved ingredients.  Surprisingly it was really easy to achieve a super delicious version.

Coconut aminos, that I usually find to be a somewhat less than perfect substitute for soy sauce, turns out to be a natural for sukiyaki.  Because the sauce for sukiyaki is quite sweet, the sweetness of the aminos allowed me to eliminate the need for sugar in the recipe.  I added just a little fish sauce to intensify the saltiness and that was it!

When I made tofu sukiyaki I would use bean threads as my noodle of choice, but for this I found that sweet potato noodles work just as well (shirataki noodles would work well too).  I get my noodles in Chinatown, but you can get them here:  https://www.amazon.com/Dragonfly-Sweet-Potato-Vermicelli-ounce/dp/B005S9U0A8

 

I use dried mushrooms I also bought in Chinatown.  To be honest I have no idea what kind they are.  They were in an open bin along with lots of other types of mushrooms and I just pointed to number 1046 and hoped it was good.  I think dried shiitaki mushrooms would be a good substitute.  For the fresh mushrooms I used a mixture of white and brown beech mushrooms as well as enoki.  Just regular white mushrooms, sliced would also work here.

CIMG2780

 

For me this recipe is a real success and I’ll be making it often.  Hope you like it too.

Enjoy!
Continue reading Paleo Sukiyaki

Kale and Sweet Potato Soup with Tiny Turkey Meatballs

Wheat-free * Dairy-free * Gluten-free *  Paleo ~~

IMG_9018

As I’ve mentioned recently (or maybe not so recently) I’m enamoured with soup meals -that is soups with enough protein, vegetables, and starch to constitute a complete meal in one bowl.  This one came about in what is not uncommon in my kitchen – leftover stuff.

I had lots of chopped kale left from the Kale and Brussels Sprouts Salad I posted last week and, due to a miscalculation on my part, way too many sliced sweet potatoes from the soup kitchen.  Further, I had purchased a pound of ground turkey at the farmer’s market (I love their turkey products) and so…Ta Ta  Sweet Potato and Kale Soup with Tiny Turkey Meatballs.

I love saying that:  Tiny Turkey Meatballs….Tiny Turkey Meatballs…. I love saying that because whenever I make meatballs of something other than beef I usually name them Turkey Balls or Lamb Balls or Pork Balls – all of which are terrible names.  However, browsing someone’s blog (can’t remember whose or I would give you a link to them) I noticed s/he made a dish with turkey balls and called it turkey meatballs…Why Didn’t I Think of That????  If only I could go back to any of my cookbooks that have recipes for some form of meatball and rename them properly…alas it’s too late for past balls – but you know all future balls will be meatballs!
Hope you love this soup – Enjoy! Continue reading Kale and Sweet Potato Soup with Tiny Turkey Meatballs

Chicken and Meatball Fricassee and Chicken Paprikash

Wheat-free * Dairy-free * Gluten-free * Paleo~~~

CIMG4201

I really don’t know what the real difference is between chicken fricassee and chicken paprikash as mom made them both the same way – except she used wings and added meatballs when she made the chicken fricassee.    Chicken paprikash she would use bigger pieces of chicken and serve with nokerle (very heavy dumplings) or she would add rice to the pot and make chicken and rice.  No matter which variation she made, they were all delicious!  Enjoy! Continue reading Chicken and Meatball Fricassee and Chicken Paprikash

Palak Shorba (Punjabi/Mughlai Spinach Soup)

Wheat-free * Dairy-free * Gluten-free * Vegetarian * Vegan * Parve * Paleo ~~~~

CIMG2466  CIMG2470

There’s a pretty good Indian restaurant just a few blocks from my apartment called Swagat.  They make a spinach soup with chicken that I always order and it occurred to me that I could probably make it at home without too much difficulty.  As I often do, I googled Palak Shorba and checked out a few of the recipes.  The one that sounded best to me was by master chef Sanjeev Kapoor.  His recipe is vegetarian, instead of the chicken soup I get at Swagat, and used lots of whole spices.  I simplified the recipe but used a similar flavor profile.  Traditionally Palak Shorba is finished with a bit of cream; but, since I’m dairy free, I use coconut cream instead.   I make this recipe often.  Frequently, I revert to the Swagat version by adding shredded cooked chicken and eating the soup as a main course.

Today I had lunch with my friend Larry at Swagat.  I ordered the Chicken Palak Shorba and brought my own version of Palak Shorba to do a taste comparison.  NO CONTEST…mine was much better.  I was shocked and pleased…Larry agreed with me.

Enjoy!
Continue reading Palak Shorba (Punjabi/Mughlai Spinach Soup)

Gluten-free Dairy-free Empanadas (not Paleo)

Wheat free * Dairy free * Gluten free

CIMG5680

I know I’m a day early, but today is Cinco de Mayo and I was going to post Empanadas this week anyway so I just moved up the post to today.  Don’t worry, you’re going to see empanadas again on Friday.

I wish I had a wonderful story to accompany this recipe, but truely I can’t even remember if I’ve actually ever eaten one before these…I mean, I MUST have at some point, but I don’t remember it.  That doesn’t mean they are not memorable – just that I have a lousy memory.

Let me take a break from these ramblings and tell you how hard writing these posts has become since the-little-one-who-shall- remain-unnamed has come to live with us.  He thinks that running over the keyboard while I sit here is just the greatest game ever invented.  What this means to me is that I am discovering functions that this computer can perform that I never even knew existed, and in some cases find incredibly difficult to undo – not to mention all the copy that just disappears in the blink of an eye (or touch of a paw).

Back to Empanadas…having made them, here are my impressions.  The filling is really delicious and so is the dough (amazingly for gluten-free).  I made little empanadas and found the dough to filling ratio is a little too much for my taste, you can remedy this by making fewer, but bigger empanadas – try making 8 and using 2 tablespoons of filling – but then they are not appetizers.   Baking time should be the same as the little ones. Continue reading Gluten-free Dairy-free Empanadas (not Paleo)

Passover Dinner

Circa 1980's
Circa 1980’s

Happy Passover.  No recipes today.  I am too bushed from last night’s seder (Passover dinner) and so busy with 2nd seder that I’m just giving you a recap of what I served at the 1st seder – you have all these recipes already.  My guests said it was the best meal they ever had ; )

Date and Pear Charoset

IMG_6992

Chicken Soup with Matzoh Balls instead of Noodles (sorry no photo with matzoh balls)

chicken noodle soup 083

Roast Chicken

IMG_2793-001

Wilted Cucumber Salad

IMG_4716

 

Tzimmes

IMG_7008

Asparagus with Homemade Hollandaise Sauce

IMG_5600

Chocolate Torte

chocolate torte 106

Save

chicken soup

Paleo * Gluten free

   chicken noodle soup 085

Here is the chicken soup recipe I promised you for last Friday – when I got way-laid by Hamantashen and then by Colcannon

Chicken soup is deeply ingrained in my food memory.  Every holiday or special dinner was introduced by a steaming bowl of chicken soup.  Of course chicken soup always magically appeared whenever I was sick.  There is no doubt that it warms my heart to walk into my home and be greeted by the perfume of a pot of chicken soup cooking on the stove.

Quick was not a term I would ever apply to my mom’s chicken soup. When she (and probably all generations before her) cooked chicken soup she would start with a yearling (old hen also called fowl in the supermarket) and boil it for 2 to 3 hours or more until the chicken was finally tender.  The secret to this great tasting quick chicken soup (less than 1 hour) is that I start with cooked chicken and I cut up the vegetables and herbs (mom always put them in the pot whole) to decrease the cooking time and increase the vegetable-y flavor. 

Noodle Soup?  Yeah, I love noodles in my soup.  Gluten-free noodles  (made with potato and tapioca – that makes them paleo) are generally available at Passover in the Kosher section of stores.  Continue reading chicken soup

Good Old Fashioned Roasted Chicken

 Paleo * Gluten free

093

Roasted chicken made many appearances in my mother’s home.  Not exactly a holiday meal – that was usually roast beef – but generally for a slightly special event.  She would always “salt” the chicken before cooking which was her nod to kosher chicken (only a nod, because the chickens themselves were never kosher –  they hadn’t been ritually slaughtered the way they needed to be).  I think the salting came from my grandmother who actually did keep a kosher home and would salt the kosher chicken  because, although most kosher chickens you buy today are already salted, back then they were not.  It turns out that all this salting today translates into brined chicken which is a very up-to-date way to treat a bird. The very short semi-brine (really brined chicken sits in a salted waterbath for several hours), will give you a really moist and succulent roast.

The next question is why do I need a recipe for roast chicken on a dairy-free site?  It seems, if you ask many experts including: Julia Child, Craig Claiborne (New York Times Cookbook), Martha Stewart, Emeril Lagassi, Ina Garten, Thomas Kellerman, Paula Deen (bless her heart, Paula Deen uses 1/2 cup of butter in her chicken – everyone else uses about 2 tablespoons), etc. that butter is an important element in creating excellent roasted chicken.  So here is my butter-free version.
Notice that I don’t bother basting; I just let the heat and rub do their job…and don’t throw the carcass away.  Place the carcass and any leftover chicken in the freezer for next Friday’s post. Continue reading Good Old Fashioned Roasted Chicken

Hash and Hash Patties

Paleo * Dairy-Free * Gluten-free *

IMG_4485  IMG_4431

Hash     –     The evolution of a recipe

You might ask yourself:  “why hash?” and “what’s hash anyway?”

Starting with the second question…Hash, according to Wikipedia is “a coarse mixture of ingredients.”  Food wise hash mostly commonly includes diced or shredded potatoes, some kind of meat, and vegetables (even just an onion will suffice) that are sauteed until slightly browned or cooked until crispy or even fried, according to your preferences.  Any vegetables, spices, or meats are acceptable in hash.

Why hash?  I’ll try to make this a not too long story…I was in the market and saw a lovely bone-in half turkey breast.

IMG_4281

I’ve never cooked one, but hey…why not?  Shorten the story to:  it didn’t turn out too well and now I have lots of turkey meat.  Sandwiches are OUT as I have yet to find a wheat-free bread I like.  What to do with leftover turkey?  Hash.

Now, what to put in my hash with the turkey.  Definitely potatoes and onions, but what else.

Fast forward to walking my dog – we walk past my local corner fruit and vegetable stand.  Spinach and Mushrooms!

009

Hmmm, needs a salty element.  I bought bacon to experiment with New England Clam Chowder.  Perfect!  and that’s how a recipe happens in my kitchen.

Hope you love it!
Continue reading Hash and Hash Patties