Tag Archives: condiment

Paleo Worcestershire Sauce – Better than Lea & Perrins®

Wheat-free * Dairy-free * Gluten-free * Vegetarian * Vegan * Parve * Paleo~~~

I’ll confess I’ve been using Lea & Perrins® Worcestershire sauce even though it’s not strictly paleo (because it contains sugar – definitely not paleo and molasses – most probably not paleo).  I figure the one drop I use in my Bloody Mary mix or tuna salad will not seriously impact my paleo life.  However, when I’m writing recipes for paleo readers; the integrity of the recipe should be maintained using strictest paleo standards.  When I decided to make paleo barbecue sauce (coming to this blog on Tuesday), I wanted to use a fairly good amount of Worcestershire and just omitting it would diminish the flavor profile significantly.

So, I did what I usually do…I googled “paleo Worcestershire sauce.”  Why reinvent the wheel if someone has already done the work?  Frankly, none of the recipes (and there are many) fit my definition of Worcestershire sauce.  They all seemed to use coconut aminos + spices – and in some cases that’s about all.  Others included ingredients like mustard, tomato sauce or paste, orange juice, and sometimes even molasses.  Not good enough for me!

It made sense to me to start with the ingredients on the Worcestershire label: white vinegar, (skip the molasses and sugar), water, salt, onions, anchovies, garlic, cloves, tamarind (a fruit that is very tart, usually found dried in a “cake” or made into a concentrate), chili pepper.  I used some ingredients to add depth to the flavor like the balsamic vinegar and ume plum vinegar and used a little maple syrup to replace the sugar and molasses.

I kept the yield small (1/4 cup) as I think most people probably use even less than 1 teaspoon at a time and I’m not sure about how long it will keep.  Since none of the ingredients are particularly perishable and the vinegar and salt are preservatives, I’m suggesting it can keep 2 weeks, but truly – I will be using it longer.

Here is the result – and I think it’s pretty terrific.

Paleo Worcestershire Sauce Better than Lea & Perrins®

If you don’t have anchovy paste, you can use 1/2 of a canned anchovy. If you are vegetarian or vegan, you can substitute 1/2 of a sun-dried tomato for the anchovy.

3 tablespoons boiling water

1 teaspoon dried tamarind or tamarind concentrate (look for it in ethnic markets)

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

2 teaspoons distilled white vinegar

2 teaspoons maple syrup

1/4 teaspoon ume plum vinegar or additional white vinegar

1/4 teaspoon anchovy paste or sun-dried tomato paste

1/4 teaspoon grated onion (use the fine side of the grater)

Pinch ground clove

Sprinkle of garlic powder

Dash hot sauce or to taste

In a mini processor or the mini processor attachment of your immersion blender (you did buy one…right?) or blender container, combine the boiling water and tamarind. Let stand 2 minutes to soften the tamarind. Process until completely combined.

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Add the remaining ingredients; process until completely combined.

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Store in covered container in the refrigerator for two weeks.

Makes: scant 1/4 cup

 

 

A Trio of Dukkahs – Great Gift Ideas

Wheat-free * Dairy-free * Gluten-free * Vegetarian * Vegan * Parve * Paleo *

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A trio of WHAT???  That would have been my response to this post just a few months ago.

Let’s start with the answer to WHAT????  Dukkah is a nut and spice mix that is found in markets all over Egypt.  Traditionally it’s served with bread (not our strong point at this blog) and olive oil.  I discovered it at Trader Joe’s.  Just after you enter the store they have a tasting station where unsuspecting customers are seduced into buying products that were not on their shopping lists.

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Most of the time I have to pass up the tasting station because there is cheese or other dairy products in the samples, but on this fateful day they had dukkah (and I was still eating bread at the time).  I dipped the bread in the olive oil and then in the dukkah and tasted it. Hmmm….I’m not sure how I feel about it.  Theirs was very anise-y and I’m on the fence about licorice flavored things – but, I buy it anyway.

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I get home and have an intense need to try it again and BOOM – love at second bite!  Suddenly I’m sprinkling it on everything from scrambled eggs, to tuna or potato salad, to smoked salmon, to hummos, to garnishing soups, seasoning chicken, fish, meats and/or kebabs, dipping bananas and Tofutti Cuties (soy ice cream sandwiches) into it.  Everything tastes better with dukkah on (or in) it.

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Now not being someone who leaves well enough alone, I had to learn more about it.  I checked out wikipedia (the spelling and pronunciation of dukkah are a whole other post’s worth of stories), and article in The New York Times, and chocolateandzucchini.com.

Then I got to work in the kitchen and came up with some excellent (if I must say so myself) recipes.  The variations are totally not traditional and none of them have anise.

Of course there are many ways to present this as a gift here are just a few ideas.

* Buy a really nice spice jar or just a regular ball jar and make a cover for it (not a hard job even if you are not too crafty).  This is a good not-too-expensive gift to give when you have lots of people on your list who you can give the same gift to.  For me, it’s my soup kitchen team.

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*  Put a jar (or 3) of Dukkah or jars of Dukkah ingredients and give them – along with the recipe AND an immersion blender with mini processor attachment

* Make a Dukkah Basket with dukkah you’ve prepared and a bottle of really nice olive oil or balsamic vinegar and fresh bread if you are giving the gift the same day as you pack it.
Continue reading A Trio of Dukkahs – Great Gift Ideas